Review of “Artifact” Film by 30 Seconds To Mars

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Nice Scarf

I watched the 30 Seconds To Mars documentary Artifact tonight. 

I went into it quite skeptical. I spent a few minutes wondering if I should spend the $4.99 to rent it on Apple TV. The trailer didn’t look too bad, and I hate the music business as it is. Since I’m mostly ignorant about the band and their music (it sounds like compressed, sound-replaced, quantized, auto-tuned Foo Fighters to me), the only thing drawing me towards it was the cinematography. 

As far as that goes, I was impressed!

But here’s the problem. THERE WAS NO CINEMATOGRAPHER CREDITED. Only Jared Leto as Director & Producer, and a handful of camera operators who had no previous credits. 

I hereby “call bullshit.”

IMDB claims the movie was shot on a Red One in Redcode RAW. Wikipedia claims “Four filmmakers taped more than three thousand hours…”

This all gives me a headache. Why?

1.) 3,000 hours of Red RAW footage. Hahaha. Very funny. That’s 8 hours of RAW footage a day for a year. Good luck EVER editing that. Or buying enough drives to store it.
2.) The cinematography was too good. Beautiful shots. Was some of it stock? Maybe.

Or maybe someone had a falling out with their cinematographer before the release?

Here’s something: I didn’t dislike the members of the band as much as I thought I would. They seemed charming and authentic enough. I’m not into fashion, so what do I know? Jared Leto came off as “distant.” Didn’t connect with the camera like the other guys in the band did. Maybe it was a level of pretense that goes along with being a star. I don’t know.

Here’s something else: Jared Leto spends most of the movie complaining about the bad contract he signed with EMI. He claims to have NEVER been paid for any 30 Seconds To Mars album sales. But at no point does he accept responsibility for signing the contract. (Don’t like the contract? Don’t sign it.) And in the end, after all the drama, he decides to sign ANOTHER contract with them, instead of turning his band into an independent business. I’m paraphrasing, but Leto described it as, “I’d end up doing a whole bunch of work I wouldn’t wanna do.” And this is why the game continues — musicians don’t like the idea of having a “job.”

Anyway, check it out sometime. Amusing story about some rich kids getting dressed up and posing as victims of the music business. Much better than the Dream Theater drummer auditions.

Thanks to Toni for the embed code.

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